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How to Use Twilio Functions with the Phone Verification API

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Twilio Functions, a serverless environment to build and run Twilio applications, was released back in May 2017 and allows you to use Node.js code for handling communications events such as a text message, an incoming voice call or HTTP requests ensuring that you can leverage the benefits of the platform like security, no infrastructure requirements, auto-scaling, native integration with Twilio REST Helper Library in a familiar environment powered by Node (6.10.x).


We could use a simple Hello World example to show you the power of Twilio Functions but instead we are going to use the Twilio Phone Verification APIs (formerly known as Authy) to demonstrate how easy to use and simple the Twilio Functions interfaces are.

The Twilio Phone Verification API allows you to verify that a given phone number is accurate and it's in the user's possession. The Phone Verification API is absolutely simple to use, one API call to request the code to be sent to the user (SMS or Voice call) and on…

Authy 2FA Automated Testing Framework

When developing a system that provides two-factor authentication capabilities it's always nice to see things working in an unit or functional testing. But, when you need to run automated integrated tests that doesn't seem to be an easy task as it might be dependent on other factors like sending and receiving SMS messages for example.

With that in mind, we have created an extensible framework for you to test your applications being deployed with Authy OneCode and Authy Phone Verification for the delivery of the one-time passwords and tokens via SMS.
The framework can be found here and it's completely free and open source.

Some of the tasks that the 2FA Automated Testing Framework is able to help you with are:


Acquire a new Twilio Number (or use an existing one)Setup a Webhook URL for the Twilio Number to forward the SMS messages generated and delivered by Authy OneCode and/or Authy Phone Verification. You can also set the framework to poll for SMS messages on your Twilio Num…

Getting Started with Authy Two-Factor Authentication in Node.js and AngularJS

If you are planning to use Two-Factor Authentication in your application or getting started with the technology, this is definitely for you. 

This simple implementation of a web application based in Node.js and AngularJS will show you how to use Two-Factor Authentication and protect assets. As a bonus feature we also have a simple Phone Verification API sample application that allows you to verify the user has the device on their possession.

To download or clone this sample application go to: https://github.com/AuthySE/Authy-demo

To get started, make sure you have Node.js and MongoDB installed and ready to go.

Follow these instructions to get up and running:
Clone the repoRun npm installRegister for a Twilio AccountSetup an Authy application via the Twilio ConsoleCopy the Authy API Key from the Authy Dashboard and save it in your demo.env fileMake sure your MongoDB instance is up and runningRun node . from the cloned repo to start the app Have fun!

How to Prevent Sublime Text from Opening Files at Startup

If you don't like the Sublime Text default behavior of opening files from your last session, here is a little trick for you.

Go to Preferences --> Settings - User and add the following settings:

"remember_open_files": false, "hot_exit": false
Then, all you have to do is to restart Sublime Text one more time.

This has been tested with Sublime Text 2 but it should work with ST 3 as well.

Two-Factor Authentication with Authy REST APIs

Ahoy! I've recently joined Twilio as a Solutions Architect in the Authy team and got my hands right away on the REST APIs we provide you to make it easier to get started with Two-Factor Authentication. Then, I put together a set of scripts that you can use to get started, test and play around with the API request and response.

Feel free to clone the GitHub repo and provide feedback if you want.

https://github.com/mjabali/Authy-API-Samples

Have fun!

Using the Ionic Framework with Oracle Mobile Cloud Services (MCS)

One of the goals of the Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS)  is to be client agnostic. So, you should be able to connect to your MCS hosted mobile backend from any client technology out there.

If you are a JavaScript developer you might be familiar with the very popular Ionic Framework.

Now, if you want to use an Ionic-based mobile app with the Oracle Mobile Cloud Service backend we have created a starter project for you that will show you how to perform the basic tasks and get you going in no time.

Have a look or clone the following GIT repo: https://github.com/mjabali/ionic-starter-mcs

The Readme file provides the instructions on how to get started with this sample.

Have fun!

Developing against Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS) with Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse (OEPE) and the Mobile Application Framework (MAF)

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If you want to get started developing against the Oracle Mobile Cloud Service (MCS) using the Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse (OEPE) and the Mobile Application Framework (MAF) here is a quick demonstration for you to get a feel and see how quick you can get things done.
In the following 5 min. demonstration you'll see how to setup a new MAF application, connect to the Oracle Cloud from Eclipse, search for the mobile backend you're interested on, import the API definition to your app, generate the required data controls, populate a new page with data and deploy to the Android emulator.

Have fun!