Wednesday, August 8, 2012

An Introduction to STOMP

STOMP (Simple (or Streaming) Text-Oriented Messaging Protocol) is a simple text-oriented protocol, similar to HTTP.

STOMP provides an interoperable wire format that allows clients to communicate with almost every available message broker. STOMP is easy to implement and gives you flexibility since it is language-agnostic, meaning clients and brokers developed in different languages can send and receive messages to and from each other. 

There are lots of server implementations that support STOMP (mostly compliant with the STOMP 1.0 specification). The following is a list of STOMP 1.0 compliant message servers:




On the client side, there are many implementations for a vast number of technologies. Below, you will find the libraries available for the most popular languages.

























STOMP is an alternative to other open messaging protocols such as AMQP (Advanced Message Queueing Protocol) and implementation specific wire protocols used in JMS (Java Message Service) brokers such as OpenWire. It distinguishes itself by covering a small subset of commonly used messaging operations (commands) rather than providing a comprehensive messaging API. 

Because STOMP is language-agnostic and easy to implement, it’s popular to application developers and technical architects alike. STOMP is also text-based. Since it does not use binary protocols like other message brokers, a wide range of client technologies work with STOMP, like Ruby, Python, and Perl.

STOMP is simple to implement, but supports a wide range of core enterprise messaging features, such as authentication, messaging models (point to point and publish and subscribe), message acknowledgement, transactions, message headers and properties, etc.



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